• Track Your Paper
  • Submit Now
  • Join Us

ISSN: 2456-7620

Women and Ecology: An Eco-Feminist Reading of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

Women and Ecology: An Eco-Feminist Reading of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart ( Vol-2,Issue-4,July - August 2017 )

Author: Ifechelobi Jane Nkechi, Asika Ikechukwu Emmanuel

Keyword: Nature, feminism, ecology, gender, society, patriarchal, culture, exploitation, oppression.

Abstract: Eco-feminism is based on the theory that the subjugation of women and the oppression of nature are linked together. Eco-feminism is linked to the study of the internal and intricate relationship between women and ecology. The theory projects that the subjugation of women and the oppression of nature are linked together. Discrimination and oppression due to power class, gender and race are directly related to the exploitation of the environment. In patriarchal societies, women and nature are ordinarily seen as fertile and capable of providing life, care and shelter. This paper highlights how Achebe uses the character of Ani, the earth goddess and Ezeani, the priest of the goddess, to showcase the similarities between women viz - a - viz their importance and nature in terms of fertility and production. It is equally an attempt to do a comparative analysis of the women in Things Fall Apart in line with nature. It x-rays the exploitation of women and environment in the novel. It will also explore the dominant male practices in Things Fall Apart relating to nature and women, how both are seen as innocent, female, productive and vulnerable to exploitation is the crux of the study.

References:

[1] Allie Fogle, “Feminist Analysis of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. December 12, 2012. Web.
[2] Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. Essex: Heinemann, 2008. Print.
[3] ---. “The Novelist as Teacher.”African Writers on African Writing. Ed. G.D. Killiam. Evanston: North-Western University Press, 1973. Print.
[4] ---. “The Role of the Writer in a New Nation.” African Writers on African Writing. Ed. G.D. Killiam. Evanston: North-Western University Press, 1973. Print.
[5] ---. “The Portrait of a Writer as a Wordsmith: Discourse Techniques in Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart.” Okike: An African Journal of New Writing. Number 50, October, 2013. Print.
[6] Baldwin, Gordon. Strange Peoples and Stranger Customs. New York: W. W. Norton and Company Inc, 1967. Print.
[7] Harris, Adrian. "The Green Fuse for Environmental Philosophy, Deep Ecology, Social Ecology, Eco-feminism, Earth-centered Spirituality". Last revised: November 2002. http://www.thegreenfuse.org/ (Accessed: 20/October/2015). Web.
[8] Linda Strong Leek. “Reading as a Woman: Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart and Feminist Criticism.”African Studies Quarterly. Volume 5, issue 2, summer 2001. Web.
[9] Mary Mellor. Introduction to Feminism & Ecology. New York: New York University Press, 1997. Web.
[10] Okoye-Ugwu, Stella.” Going Green: Ecocritical Reading of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart.” Okike: An African Journal of New Writing. Number 50, October 2013. Print.
[11] Quinby, L. Ecofeminism and the Politics of Resistance. In I. Diamond & G. F. Orenstein (Eds.), Reweaving the World: The Emergence of Ecofeminism (pp. 122-127). San Francisco: Sierra Club Books. 1990. Print.
[12] Reyhaneh Sadat Shadpour and Zolfagharkhani, Moslem. “An Eco-critical Study of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart.” Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies (JETERAPS) 4(2):210-214. Print.
[13] Salleh, A. The Ecofeminism/Deep Ecology Debate: A Reply to Patriarchal Reason. Environmental Ethics, 14, 195-216. 1992. Web.
[14] Warren, K. J. The Power and Promise of Ecological Feminism. Environmental Ethics, 12, 125-146. 1990. Web.

ijeab doi crossrefDOI: 10.24001/ijels.2.4.5

Total View: 368 Downloads: 61 Page No: 033-040